Child is subconsciously rocking her body - is this normal?

By Posted on 24/07/2015
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Hi Edgar, I have a 4 yo child who has been rocking her involuntarily during meals on high chair since young. She would be eating then after awhile she would press her hands and start rocking as if simulating herself. When we ask her to stop, she doesn’t immediately. In recent months, we notice such behavior during her sit down time at the table to write especially if it’s long. She would stop her work while rocking. Is this normal? How to correct this behavior. We changed her to childcare jyz last week and receive the same feedback from teachers that she rocks alot during class time, especially when sitting on chair. Her previous Kindi teacher didn’t observe such behaviour though.

(extracted from Facebook Q&A)

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Hi Edgar, I have a 4 yo child who has been rocking her involuntarily during meals on high chair since young. She would be eating then after awhile she would press her hands and start rocking as if simulating herself. When we ask her to stop, she doesn’t immediately. In recent months, we notice such behavior during her sit down time at the table to write especially if it’s long. She would stop her work while rocking. Is this normal? How to correct this behavior. We changed her to childcare jyz last week and receive the same feedback from teachers that she rocks alot during class time, especially when sitting on chair. Her previous Kindi teacher didn’t observe such behaviour though.

(extracted from Facebook Q&A)

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Posted on 28/07/2015

Hi Edgar. Is shaking legs a type of rhythmic movement that is deemed normal or the kids are showing that they are nervous or uneasy?  Thanks!

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Posted on 24/07/2015

Thank you Joan. Body rocking is a type of rhythmic movement that may still be seen in normal, healthy children by up to 5 years old. But know that if the body rocking behaviour does not interfere with sleep or result in injury, there no cause for alarm.
NOTE: I apologize that I am not a specialist in this area unfortunately. Therefore you may need to seek further advice from your family medicine practitioner or a clinical psychologist for more detailed help or assistance please. Thank you.

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